Yearly: 2017

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Lost In 2017: Part Two

Topps baseball, football, basketball, hockey, custom cards that never were

Part
Two of RetroCards “Lost In 20017” continues with a cache of “cards that
never were.”  This entry picks up where Part One left off with some
obscure sports players shown on cards you’ve never seen before as well
as several beloved pop culture figures that are quite recognizable. 
Here are the honorees from both posts:

Sports figures we lost in 2017: John Reaves, Babe Parilli, Gene Conely, Dave Stallworth, Y.A. Tittle, Connie Hawkins, Bernie Casey, J.C Caroline, Joe Fortunato, Dave Grayson, Johnny Robinson, Wayne Walker, Larry Grantham, Toby Kimball, Lee Maye, Don Baylor, Dave Stallworth, Yale Lary, Steve Jones, Danny Schock, Ken Gray, Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, Tommy Nobis, Charley Hennigan, Pervis Atkins, Jerry Kindall, Ray Brown, Hal Bedsole, Ernie Fazio, Al Luplow, and Willie Townes.

TV & Pop Culture figures we lost in 2017: Patty Duetsch, Richard Anderson, Erin Moran, Bobby “the Brain” Heenan, Adam West, Martin Landau, Stephen Furst, William Christopher, Mary Tyler Moore, David Cassidy, Jerry Lewis, Hugh Hefner, Butch Trucks, Gregg Allman, Richard Hatch, Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, Walter Becker, Tom Petty, Dick Gautier, Glen Campbell, Chuck Barris, Monte Hall, Jim Nabors, Robert Guillaume, Heather North, John Hillerman, Malcolm Young, Judge Joseph Wapner, Heather Menzies, & Rose Marie.

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Lost In 2017: Part One

Topps, Deaths in 2017, sports, celebrities


RetroCards
shines one last spotlight on some of the sports figures and pop culture
personalities that we lost in 2017. I think it’s safe to say many of
these people have made life more fun and enjoyable.

Some of the cards you see here have already been released such as the Non-sport sets like Kolchak: The Night Stalker features a card of Dick Gautier, while Patty Deutsch can be found the Match Game set. Many of these sports cards can also be found in RetroCard team sets that are available.

Since we lost so many in 2017, I am splitting this entry into two posts. Here are the honorees:

Sports figures we lost in 2017: John Reaves, Babe Parilli, Gene Conely, Dave Stallworth, Y.A. Tittle, Connie Hawkins, Bernie Casey, J.C Caroline, Joe Fortunato, Dave Grayson, Wayne Walker, Larry Grantham, Toby Kimball, Lee Maye, Don Baylor, Dave Stallworth, Yale Lary, Steve Jones, Danny Schock, Ken Gray, Mamie “Peanut” Johnson, Tommy Nobis, Charley Hennigan, Pervis Atkins, Jerry Kindall, Ray Brown, Ernie Fazio, Al Luplow, Hal Bedsole, and Willie Townes.
TV & Pop Culture figures we lost in 2017: Patty Duetsch, Richard Anderson, Erin Moran, Bobby “the Brain” Heenan, Adam West, Martin Landau, Stephen Furst, William Christopher, Mary Tyler Moore, David Cassidy, Jerry Lewis, Hugh Hefner, Butch Trucks, Gregg Allman, Richard Hatch, Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, Walter Becker, Tom Petty, Dick Gautier, Glen Campbell, Chuck Barris, Monte Hall, Jim Nabors, Robert Guillaume, Heather North, John Hillerman, Malcom Young, Judge Joseph Wapner, Heather Menzies, and Rose Marie.

P.S. In a effort to further honor humanity, RetroCards refrained from creating a Charles Manson card. 

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1965 Philadelphia: Series 5!

1965 topps NFL football cards that never were

Closing out the 1965 Philadelphia football card set is series five which is split between NFL and ALF players.  We just couldn’t stop at four series so here are the remaining 24 players – many very good ones too!  Series five NFL include: J.C. Caroline, Tucker Frederickson, Ted Karras, Larry Wilson, Tom Matte, Les Josephson, Bennie McRae, Bob Brown, Len Hauss, Bruce Bosley, Alex Karras, and Ed O’Bradovich.  AFL players include All-Stars such as Billy Shaw, Tobin Rote, Ben Davidson, Pete Liske, Daryle Lamonica, Tom Addison, Bud McFadin, Fred Arbanas, Emil Karas, Sherman Plunkett, and Chuck Shonta.

This series includes an additional 3 checklists outlining series 1-5 plus the 1965 team sets of the Dallas Cowboys and Green Bay Packers. Get it here!

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1965 Philadelphia: Series 4, More AFL!

Topps 1965 NFL football cards

Continuing with more AFL stars, RetroCards 1965 Philadelphia style series four set does not disappoint. It contains 24 more cards of some of the AFL’s top performers of the mid-sixties.

Series four include: Leslie Duncan, Dave Grayson, Houston Antwine, Matt Snell, Elbert Dubenion, Paul Lowe, Babe Parilli, Willie Brown, Tom Sestak, Cotton Davidson, Dave Kocourek, Mike Stratton, Buck Buchanan, George Blanda, Gene Mingo, Sid Blanks, Ernie Warlick, Wahoo McDaniel, E.J. Holub, Ernie Wright, Walt Suggs, Larry Grantham, Goose Gonsoulin, and Jim Lee Hunt.  Get yours here!

 

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1965 Philadelphia Design Adds The AFL!

custom cards that never were, topps, AFL, American Football league

Continuing with the extensive 1965 supplemental sets, RetroCards unveils series three.  What makes this unique when compared with the Philadelphia football cards of the 1960s is that series 3 & 4 feature AFL stars.  Each series offers 24 cards of 1965’s greatest American Football League stars along with a few fan favorites.  Most are All-Stars and some even became Pro Football Hall of Famers.

Players in series three include: Joe Namath, Butch Byrd, Tom Flores, Johnny Robinson, Ernie Ladd, Charley, Hennigan, Bobby Bell, Gino Cappeletti, Jack Kemp, Cookie Gilchrist, Lance Alworth, Lionel Taylor, Len Dawson, Ron Mix, Abner, Haynes, Don Maynard, Jim Otto, Winston Hill, Nick Buoniconti, Keith Lincoln, and Fred “the hammer” Williamson.  Also included are a Championship card as well as an AFL All-Star Game card.

The 1964 AFL All-Star Game is notable for the player boycott that took place after New Orleans hotels wouldn’t admit black players.  Other black players were stranded at the airport or where given cab rides miles from their destinations.  In a show of solidarity, white players supported the black players in a boycott and the game was hastily moved to Houston where 15,000+ enjoyed the AFL’s finest.  Get it here.

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Otto Stowe: Outspoken And Out Of A Job

Topps football cards 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, custom cards that never were

One of the flashier players in the NFL in the early 70s was wide receiver Otto Stowe who got himself a Super Bowl ring as a member of the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins.  Born in Chicago, Illinois and having left Iowa State as the all-time leader in receptions and yards, Stowe entered the NFL as a 2nd round pick of the Dolphins in 1971.

Used as the main back up to Paul Warfield, Stowe had productive second year (he caught 6 passes for 140 yards and 2 touchdowns on a Monday night game) and looked like he had the tools to be a star receiver.  Not seeing an opportunity to start in Miami, he requested a trade at the end of the Dolphins undefeated 1972 season. 
The Cowboys, who had been trying to replace the aging Bob Hayes and the retired Lance Alworth, traded the productive Ron Sellers and a 6th round draft choice for the speedier Stowe.  It looked like he had found the perfect home in 1973, catching 22 passes for a league leading 6 touchdowns in what was looking like a Pro Bowl season.  Stylistically, he had one of the leading afros in the NFL and, while with the Cowboys, he modeled suits for Hart Schaffner & Marx.  Unfortunately, he broke his ankle in the 7th game in 1973 and was lost for the rest of the season.
The feeble NFL Player’s strike that started in training camp of the 1974 season put everyone in a bad mood and Stowe, who was one of the last of the veterans to cross the line, was soon singled out.  His ankle had not fully healed and he had a difficult training camp running on the rock-hard Thousand Oaks training camp surface.  He was also out-spoken about the way the Cowboys had treated Calvin Hill, who left to sign a contract with the WFL.  Receivers coach Mike Ditka said Stowe “was not applying himself” and was traded to the Denver Broncos on October 6, 1974 for a draft choice. “I hated to see that man go.  He could have helped us win the Super Bowl,” said All-Pro tackle Rayfield Wright.  Cliff Harris and Mel Renfro considered him the “best receiver on the team.”  Rookie Drew Pearson, who was mentored by Stowe, was also sad to see him go.
Still hampered by the ankle injury, Stowe had a disappointing 1974 season in Denver, catching only two passes.  Somehow, he was still in demand and was traded to the Rams at the beginning of the 1975 season but he announced his retirement on August 18, 1975.
RetroCards pays tribute to this underrated player who, like many other talented and overlooked players, didn’t have any sports cards in his entire career.  RetroCards has created a few and there are more to come so stay tuned.